Tuesday Trivia: May 18, 2021

1 minutes
Answer this Oklahoma trivia question to receive awesome prizes!

Test your Oklahoma knowledge and win prizes by answering our weekly Tuesday Trivia question. Every week, we’ll choose a winner from the correct respondents to receive a prize—from an Okie sticker to a subscription to Oklahoma Today and more.

The beginning and the end can both be found in Oklahoma. Since our Question of the Week deals with interesting Oklahoma town names, we've been poring over maps and came across a pair of unincorporated communities separated by a scant nine miles: Alpha and Omega. There's not a ton of information about them online, but we couldn't help but chuckle at this tidbit—Omega's post office was established in 1892, while Alpha's post office was established in 1893. Which means, at least in Oklahoma, the end came before the beginning.

In what county can the Oklahoma communities of Alpha and Omega be found?

Submit your answer

I understand this information may be used for marketing
Written By
Greg Elwell

Web Editor Greg worked for newspapers, medical research organizations, and government institutions before he joined *Oklahoma Today*. He also is the publisher of the website I Ate Oklahoma.

Greg Elwell
Previous Blog

"Weekly Events Calendar, May 17-23, 2021"

Next Blog

"Diploma, See?"

You May Like

Weekly Events Calendar, July 19-25, 2021

Rock musicals, exotic lizards, and cheese fries. Sounds like another fun week in Oklahoma.

Rock musicals, exotic lizards, and cheese fries. Sounds like another fun week in Oklahoma.

By Olivia McCourry | 5 min read Read BLOG

Tuesday Trivia: July 20, 2021

Know your Oklahoma museums? Then this Tuesday Trivia might be right up your alley. Answer correctly for a chance to win a prize from Okla...

Know your Oklahoma museums? Then this Tuesday Trivia might be right up your alley. Answer correctly for a chance to win a prize from Oklahoma Today.

By Greg Elwell | 2 min read Read BLOG

Back Forward: The Washita Massacre

The 1868 Battle of Washita River, later known as the Washita Massacre, shows how history can change when viewed in context.

The 1868 Battle of Washita River, later known as the Washita Massacre, shows how history can change when viewed in context.

By Olivia McCourry | 5 min read Read STORY