Tuesday Trivia: May 25, 2021

1 minutes
Answer this Oklahoma trivia question to receive awesome prizes!

Test your Oklahoma knowledge and win prizes by answering our weekly Tuesday Trivia question. Every week, we’ll choose a winner from the correct respondents to receive a prize—from an Okie sticker to a subscription to Oklahoma Today and more.

If ever someone was aptly named, it was Osage Principal Chief James Bigheart. Not only did he serve the Osage Nation from 1875 to 1906, but his leadership went from the individual to the national. He helped negotiate the 1906 Osage Allotment Act, preserving the tribe's ownership of mineral rights and ensuring its financial security. His legacy is celebrated in many places, including a nine-foot statue of the leader in Pawhuska. One Osage County city celebrates Bigheart Day annually.

What Oklahoma city celebrates Bigheart Day?

Submit your answer

I understand this information may be used for marketing
Written By
Greg Elwell

Web Editor Greg worked for newspapers, medical research organizations, and government institutions before he joined *Oklahoma Today*. He also is the publisher of the website I Ate Oklahoma.

Greg Elwell
Previous Blog

"Weekly Events Calendar, May 24-30, 2021"

Next Blog

"Weekly Events Blog, May 31-June 6, 2021"

You May Like

Weekly Events Calendar, July 19-25, 2021

Rock musicals, exotic lizards, and cheese fries. Sounds like another fun week in Oklahoma.

Rock musicals, exotic lizards, and cheese fries. Sounds like another fun week in Oklahoma.

By Olivia McCourry | 5 min read Read BLOG

Tuesday Trivia: July 20, 2021

Know your Oklahoma museums? Then this Tuesday Trivia might be right up your alley. Answer correctly for a chance to win a prize from Okla...

Know your Oklahoma museums? Then this Tuesday Trivia might be right up your alley. Answer correctly for a chance to win a prize from Oklahoma Today.

By Greg Elwell | 2 min read Read BLOG

Back Forward: The Washita Massacre

The 1868 Battle of Washita River, later known as the Washita Massacre, shows how history can change when viewed in context.

The 1868 Battle of Washita River, later known as the Washita Massacre, shows how history can change when viewed in context.

By Olivia McCourry | 5 min read Read STORY